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Posts Tagged ‘seax’

It’s been a little over a year since I’ve updated this site. I have not been idle though. It’s easy to let social media and other online platforms slip away. I won’t be able to update you on all the work I’ve done this past year, but here are some of the highlights.

I’ve made quite a few friction folders, lots of different styles. I enjoy making folders, it’s satisfying to get the action just right. It takes a little experience to know what works and what doesn’t with these little guys, and if feels like I’m getting the hang of it.

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I’ve also made quite a few of my standard length sheath knives, here are some of my favorites.

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There are lots of other types of knives and tools I’ve made since the last post, but I’ll leave you with one last style, one of my personal favorites. The seax. Here are two very different examples. One pattern welded, and one with a mono-steel blade with an auto-hamon.

pwlambertseax4 pwlambertseax7 oakseax oakseax3

Wait, here is one more! This seax is available for purchase! Curly maple, birch bark and copper handle with a 6 bar pattern welded blade. Email me Nrunals@gmail.com for more info.

 

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Here is my most recent knife. It’s an Anglo-Saxon broken back Seax. The blade is 1084, the handle is Oak that I’ve darkened with my home made stain. It has copper fittings, and the sheath has traditional stamping, and copper reinforcements. This knife is for sale here.

I’m really starting to love making historically inspired blades, those old smiths were quite clever. When you hold a blade based on old designs they just feel different. There is something intuitive about these knives, I can’t quite put my finger on it….

 

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One of my wonderful repeat customers asked me to make him a Viking style every day sort of knife that he could use for small game hunting, eating, and camping.  I decided not to follow a strict historical pattern, rather I was influenced by many different archeological finds and my own imagination.  I wanted a relatively simple design with little adornment, and a traditional look.

Here is the result.

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The blade is made of 1084 high carbon steel. The spine is a little over 3/16″, and the length is about 5″

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The handle is made of Red Oak that I darkened with a vinegar and iron mixture. It’s about 5″ as well

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This type of sheath holds the knife very tightly. To make it easier to draw out, a copper ring is added onto the back of the knife.

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Finally a sheath is made of thick vegetable tanned leather. It is coated in beeswax and has a leather hanger.

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This is a knife that I actually made for myself. I tried to make it look well used by a Viking commoner. I spent a long time trying to achieve the proper patina on the blade and handle, I used things like lemons, vinegar, onions, soot, coal dust, and raw linseed oil to get the desired look.  The blade is 1084 high carbon steel, the handle is maple with a brass bolster and an inset brass rivet block. The sheath is veg tanned leather “stained” with soot and sealed with beeswax.  The metal on the sheath is brass and copper.

Blade length: 4 1/2″
Handle length: 4″
Blade thickness 3/16″

 

Like I said this is my personal knife and is not for sale, but I can certainly make one just like it for you.

 

 

 

 

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