Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘nate runals’

About a month and a half ago I was approached by a customer with a pretty interesting request. He said that he was a traveling tattoo artist/illusionist and he would like an entire set of knives to make him look like Bill the Butcher from Gangs of New York.  After some back and forth we nailed down a design, this was a great customer to work with because he knew the basics of what he wanted, but let me have total artistic freedom with the project, I think it paid off.  His website is www.inkllusionist.com

To start off he wanted a HUGE cleaver 9″ blade that is 5″ tall 1/4″ thick with an 8″ handle.  He also wanted 2 belt knives, 5 throwing knives, and a belt with hand forged hardware to hang it all off of. I decided that it needed a sharpening steel, so I added that to the package as well.

It slipped my mind to get some shots of the throwing knives in the final photos, so here is one before everything is done.

The hardware for the sharpening steel.

I had my friend Rusty ofMercy Leatherworks give me a hand making the belt.

This was a pretty fun and interesting project, if you have the chance to go see Seven from The Ink Illusionists you definitely should.

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

This is a knife that I actually made for myself. I tried to make it look well used by a Viking commoner. I spent a long time trying to achieve the proper patina on the blade and handle, I used things like lemons, vinegar, onions, soot, coal dust, and raw linseed oil to get the desired look.  The blade is 1084 high carbon steel, the handle is maple with a brass bolster and an inset brass rivet block. The sheath is veg tanned leather “stained” with soot and sealed with beeswax.  The metal on the sheath is brass and copper.

Blade length: 4 1/2″
Handle length: 4″
Blade thickness 3/16″

 

Like I said this is my personal knife and is not for sale, but I can certainly make one just like it for you.

 

 

 

 

Read Full Post »

I’m really starting to enjoy making laminated blades. Something about adding 100+ year old wrought iron into a knife really adds to the overall joy I get out of making and using These blades.

I just finished up this knife, it’s a wrought iron and 1084 laminated blade. The handle was a piece of oak that was about to be burned,but when I split it I noticed a very nice figured grain, so here it is, not in the fire.

Something else I did with this knife is really try to stick to the plan. I usually draw out rough sketches, but I never really consult them during the making of the knife. I feel like it paid off this time, I like how this one turned out. There are always things to be improved upon, but this is a step in the right direction.

If you’re interested, the knife can be purchased here.

Read Full Post »

 

 

A few months ago a bladesmithing community that I’m a part of decided to do something pretty neat. Everyone would make a knife based on a theme that we would all agree upon, and at the end of the given time we’d swap knives.

My knife went to a guy in Delaware

The knife I got was from a guy who lives in the Czech Republic named Hloh. He’s a really great guy who makes very good knives in a primitive style. Lots of times he doesn’t use any electricity,  forges with a ground forge, and charcoal, and uses lots of repurposed materials.

This is the knife he made.

    

The package came in the mail last week and I was so excited! To start off it was very heavy,  and wrapped in butcher paper. I tore off the paper to find a very old wooden box wrapped up in string

 

…. And the contents

    

Included in the package: The original dagger, a folding knife, a small detailing knife, a very old hammer head, some lilac wood, and some Italian walnut. Hloh is a very generous man! It was so exciting to receive all of these things.

 

I decided to rehandle the hammer head right away, and put it back to work.  It required a bit of filing to make the faces true, and get rid of the mushrooming around the eye, but it was short work, enjoyable too. I don’t know how old this hammer head is,  but it’s hand forged, and seems very old.

 

The next step was to make a handle for it. It seemed only fitting to make the handle using only hand tools, specifically hand forged hand tools.

     

And the hammers first job. A small detailing knife.

 

 

Thanks Hloh!

 

Read Full Post »

« Newer Posts